Salt Crystallisation and Mechanical Damage in Historic Masonry

In January 2013, the JPI Cultural Heritage launched its first Joint Pilot Call for Research Proposals in Cultural Heritage. Ten successful projects were selected for funding, and nine of these are now officially up and running. Over the coming weeks we will be profiling each of the successful projects - on subjects ranging from heritage values to waterlogged wood, and from cultural heritage landscapes to the deterioration of lead and zinc white pigments in painting.

The fifth project that we've chosen is looking at the Kinetics of Salt Crystallisation and Mechanical Damage in Historic Masonry (KISADAMA).

KISADAMA LogoThe objective of the project is to develop an integrated approach for modeling and analysis of the decay mechanism of masonry structures (made from fired clay or natural stone) due to salt crystallization. In particular, the idea is to combine, at the (sub)micro-scale, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies to model the interaction between crystallization and deformation/damage of the porous masonry material and, then, to transfer this information to the macro-scale, in order to develop effective predictive tools, useful from an engineering point of view. In this way, a greater understanding of crystallization processes will be achieved and can used to predict damage behaviour. For example, the results will elucidate why the same salt can cause damage in some conditions and not in others.

This project will allow us to (1) quantify the internal changes in 3D at a pore-scale level; (2) use these observations to create new models and to provide instant feedback towards these models; (3) predict the macroscopic effects, based on microscopic observed phenomena and processes. Therefore, a deep understanding of the crystallization processes can be achieved and future damage scenarios can be predicted. The highly advanced tools employed in the project are the high resolution X-ray computed tomography, micro experiments on salt nucleation and growth in confined geometries and designed porous network, and micro-macro FE numerical modelling.

KISADAMA has a total budget of €420,525 and will run over a two year period, from November 2013 to October 2015.

You can learn more about KISADAMA by visiting their website (http://www.kisadama.eu/) and by consulting the PDF factsheet attached below.

SUBMITTED BY: admin admin AUTHOR: HP Editor/KISADAMA ORIGINAL PUBLISHED DATE: 5/28/2014

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